16 Aug

3 THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT CASH-BACK MORTGAGES

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Posted by: Peter Paley & Associates

Today’s blog is about Cash-back mortgages. To be honest I’m not a very big fan of them. However, they can be a very useful tool for homebuyers if used correctly. I feel that many of the big banks use them as a lure to attract unsuspecting first-time homebuyers. This blog is jam packed with great information.

enjoy the blog!

3 THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT CASH-BACK MORTGAGES

About twice a year, one of the big Canadian banks likes to run an advertising campaign for their cash back mortgages. These are mortgages usually with 5 year terms where you receive a certain percentage back in cash. The percentage varies from 1% to 5% in most cases. You can use these funds to build a fence, landscape, buy window coverings etc. The idea is to be able to pay for some things that you would not be able to as you put all your money into the down payment and closing costs and need some help to get started.

1- There are multiple lenders who have cash back mortgages. Don’t jump at the first one you see. They all have different terms and conditions.
2. You are really getting a loan on top of your mortgage. The interest rate is calculated so that by the end of the term you will have paid the lender back the money they gave you and a little bit extra. Sometimes this little bit extra may be twice as much as you got in cash back.
3 – The average cash back mortgage is a 5 year term. Most Canadians move every 30 months. Therefore when you break a cash back mortgage you have to pay a penalty as per usual but you also have to pay back a portion of the loan that they gave you. If you are 36 months into a 60 month mortgage, you have to pay them back 2 years’ worth or 40% of the cash back. Combined with the penalty this can be a hefty sum. In addition, there are some lenders who require you to pay back 100% of the cash back if you want to break the term.

Before signing for a cash back mortgage it’s better to discuss your needs with your local Dominion Lending Centres mortgage professional. They can advise you on cash backs, line of credit, Purchase plus Improvements or Flex Down mortgages which may be better for your situation.

David Cooke
DAVID COOKE

13 Aug

WHAT IS A MORTGAGE BROKER?

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Posted by: Peter Paley & Associates

Our Blog today comes from our colleague from Saskatchewan. In Manitoba, our regulator is the Manitoba Securities Commission. Manitoba is similar to Saskatchewan with a few differences.

WHAT IS A MORTGAGE BROKER?
You may have noticed that there are many different terms for those of us who work in the mortgage industry besides “broker”.
Mortgage: specialist, expert, advisor, associate, officer, etc. I just want to clear up some potential confusion with all these monikers.
There are 2 main categories that these fall in to. Those that work for a bank to sell mortgage products available from that bank.
The other is for those like myself that work within a mortgage brokerage that has no direct affiliation with any one bank.
Each mortgage brokerage has agreements in place with multiple banks and mortgage lenders to be able to submit mortgage applications for consideration.
There are of course obvious differences between these but some may not be quite so apparent.

Mortgage Brokerage
All those working in the mortgage brokerage industry must be licensed by a provincial government agency, in Saskatchewan it’s called the Financial & Consumer Affairs Authority (FCAA).
While every province has their own set of guidelines, there are 3 different types of licenses offered by FCAA: mortgage associate, mortgage broker & principal broker.
The mortgage associate and broker are very similar as both advertise themselves to obtain clientele, work directly with the clients, mortgage lenders, mortgage insurers, realtors and lawyers in the service of their clients. The key difference is that an associate must work under a supervising mortgage broker to ensure they remain in compliance with FCAA regulations.
Each mortgage brokerage will have a principal broker (aka: broker of record) that oversees the operations of the brokerage as well as all the associates and brokers within the brokerage.
Most all those working in the mortgage broker industry are commission based. Our income is derived from the mortgage lenders that we submit mortgage applications to.

In order to apply for a license as a mortgage associate, applicants must complete an approved mortgage associate education course and provide a current criminal record check along with the required application documents.

Application for a license as a mortgage broker are the same as for an associate with the addition of a previous experience requirement.
The applicant must have been licensed as a mortgage associate for at least 24 of the previous 36 months.

In addition to annual applications for renewal, licensees must also:

Purchase and remain in good standing with professional errors and omissions insurance
Complete FCAA approved annual continuing education courses
Provide FCAA auditors access to mortgage files for review whenever requested
Advise FCAA of any changes to brokerage or contact information
Immediately advise FCAA of any offences under the criminal code (other that traffic offenses)
Bank Branch Mortgage
Those that work in mortgage lending for a bank are normally paid by the hour or are salaried and may have a performance bonus structure.
Entry level positions do not require any education beyond high school. Training is provided on the job by the employer with supervision by the branch manager and more experienced staff.
There are no licensing requirements by any provincial or federal governing body and errors and omissions insurance is not required.
Many banks have mobile mortgage staff that may or may not conduct business within the branch and are often paid on a commission basis rather than hourly or salary.

If you have any questions, contact your Dominion Lending Centres Mortgage Broker near you.

Kevin Carlson
KEVIN CARLSON

8 Aug

4 COSTS TO CONSIDER AS A FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYER

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Posted by: Peter Paley & Associates

I remember when I purchased my first time in 1998 and was living the dream. I was 22 years old. 3 months after I moved in and I received my first water bill (billed quarterly). I remember calling my mom and asked her “Is this for real?” After she finished laughing at me, she confirmed that the utility bill was indeed legit. This embarrassing anecdote is just an example of things you can over look when buying a home.

enjoy today’s blog…

4 COSTS TO CONSIDER AS A FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYER

Oftentimes even the most organized and detail oriented first-time homebuyer can overlook some unexpected costs that come with the purchase of their new home. We are outlining 4 of the costs that we most commonly see overlooked by home buyers in hopes that we can better prepare you—and save you from a few surprises!

1. Closing Costs.

Congratulations! Your offer was just accepted on your new home, you’re one step closer to adding a major asset to your portfolio! We don’t want to shock or dampen the excitement of this moment. However, it’s important that you factor in closing costs right at the beginning of your purchase.

The best time to do this is before even applying for your pre-approval or making any offers on a home. Closing costs may include:
>insurance
>taxes (Land Transfer, Property, and others depending on what province you are in)
>legal/notary fees
>inspection/appraisal fees.

A general rule of thumb is to set aside 1.5% of the purchase price to account for the closing costs above. To plan ahead, consider speaking to a mortgage broker and your realtor. They can help you determine just how much you should set aside to accommodate those additional closing costs.

2. Utility Bills.
If you’ve gotten used to living in a small space, such as a condo or an apartment, you may be surprised how much more water, heat, and energy you consume in a larger space such as a detached home or a townhouse.

It’s important to prepare for these as you do not want to have a “surprise” when your bill arrives in the mail and it’s nearly double what you are used to spending!

Factoring in these bills is also crucial if you are going from renting to owning! Often times the landlord will cover a portion of your utility bills or your cable/internet depending on the contract you had with your landlord. Of course, once you are a homeowner, you are covering the entire cost! Ask family members, friends, even your mortgage broker or realtor what is a realistic cost for things such as cable and internet, water, heat, etc. You’d be surprised how fast they can add up!

3. Renovations and Updates.

Unless you bought a newly built, brand new home, there is undoubtedly going to be future renovations and updates that you will need to do on your home. They may not need to happen right when you move in, but sometimes the unexpected does happen and having money set aside can make a world of difference! When you have your home inspection completed, make a prioritized list of what will need to be fixed/updated first and set aside money each month for it.

In addition to the “must do” updates/renovations, new property owners may also want to make aesthetic improvements, whether they mean to reside there or not. Naturally, a homeowner wants to make the place feel more like their own, and investors want to add value their investment or make adjustments to make the asset more aesthetically pleasing.

4. Ongoing Maintenance
Home’s require maintenance—all the time! Ask any homeowner and they will tell you that there is always home maintenance in one form or another happening. A few common home maintenance costs may include:
• Gutter cleaning
• Roof repair/maintenance
• Drywall repair
• Furnace cleaning
• HVAC and Duct cleaning
• General plumbing and electrical fixes
Every home is different in regards to how much you should budget annually for regular maintenance. It will depend on the age of your home, square footage, climate in your region, and overall condition of your home.

In closing, property ownership shouldn’t be dampened by financial rules caused by lack of preparation. All of these costs, as well as additional other costs, are easy to plan ahead for and to ensure that you have budget set aside each and every single month to make sure that you stay on track. As a rule of thumb, the CMHC states that your housing costs including mortgage payment should not exceed 39% of your monthly income. Treat this number as a point of reference when you’re doing your budget and consider leaving room for the unexpected. It’ll give you peace of mind on the long run and allow you to actually enjoy your new home!

Geoff Lee
GEOFF LEE

7 Aug

MORTGAGES ARE LIKE COFFEE

General

Posted by: Peter Paley & Associates

“What is your best rate?” is the number one question I get as a mortgage broker. My answers is usually in a joking tone, “0% Fixed rate, all you need is a 100% down payment”. While rate is important, it certainly isn’t the be-all end-all. Today’s blog will discuss the differences.

Enjoy the blog!

MORTGAGES ARE LIKE COFFEE

The most common question we get for mortgages is “what is your best rate?” Now imagine we walked into our local coffee shop and asked “what is your best price?” Doesn’t happen. There are all kinds of different coffees and lots of ways to make them. The same goes for mortgages.

Getting a coffee at the lowest price is usually not going to get you the coffee that meets your needs. You want quality beans, flavour, extra features like a shot of caramel, maybe make it a macchiato, froth on the top, an alternative milk option, and the list goes on.

The same goes for mortgages. Lowest rate mortgages may come with a lack of portability, the inability to make extra payments, and they may lock you into a good rate today without the flexibility for better rates in the future. They may be the lowest rate without the lowest monthly payment amount, they may be for term lengths that are too long and have significant penalties when the mortgage needs to be broken.

The lowest rate mortgage may be collateral charge mortgages that allow a bank to foreclose on your property because you were delinquent on your credit card payments while you went on an extended vacation in Europe and forgot to keep track while you were having so much fun drinking coffee at a popular little hole in the wall café in some small ancient village. The 4 strategic priorities that every mortgage needs to balance are lowest cost, lowest payment, maximum flexibility, and lowest risk.

So the next time you need a mortgage, treat it like your coffee order, don’t ask for the best rate, ask how you can get the best mortgage that meets your needs.

TODD SKENE

1 Aug

FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER INCENTIVE – CMHC

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Posted by: Peter Paley & Associates

Yesterday, the Government of Canada released a number of tools and resources on the First-Time Home Buyer Incentive program page.

Here’s a list of the items you can expect to find:
• An Eligibility Calculator to test and evaluate different financial scenarios and view their impact on
mortgage payments.
• A Product Highlight Sheet (PDF) including a summary of key program details in a format that is easy to
download, print and share.
• A Journey Map breaking down the application process step by step.
• An Application Process diagram (PDF) showing the interactions between all of the parties involved.

(Available on desktop only).

In addition, live training sessions will be available to ensure homebuyers and industry professionals alike have access to the latest tools and information pertaining to the Incentive. Three separate sessions will cover Qualification, Application Submission and Funding, plus a live Q&A period. Click here to view the full training schedule and to register for a session.

For all this and more, visit:
www.placetocallhome.ca